rhade-zapan:

I Discovered Audrey Horne Lying In My Bed… by Kyle MacLachlan

—Track 30 —

Night dwellers visit, but we do not take advantage of children. We give them food and a ear, and do not hesitate to shoulder decisions that make others shudder.

(via thesleepragnt)

(Source: youtube.com, via capnskull)

awwww-cute:

My puppy has never experienced this much grass before

awwww-cute:

My puppy has never experienced this much grass before

(via fromanothershore)

visualizingmath:

ted:

What do leopard spots, striped marine angelfish, and sand dune ripples have in common? Their patterns are self-organizing Turing systems! Discovered by Alan Turing in the 1950s, these repeating natural patterns can be created by the interaction of two things that spread at different speeds, one faster than the other.

I knew that name was familiar! Alan Turing is quite an interesting person. Wikipedia lists him as “a British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, philosopher, computer scientist, mathematical biologist, and marathon and ultra distance runner”! Furthermore, “Winston Churchill said that Turing made the single biggest contribution to Allied victory in the war against Nazi Germany” cracking codes! Read about him!

mindblowingscience:

IN AUTISM, BRAIN DOESN’T ‘PRUNE’ EXTRA SYNAPSES
Neurons in brains from people with autism do not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from unaffected brains (top) and brains from autistic patients (bottom); the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses. (Credit: Guomei Tang, Mark S. Sonders/CUMC)

Neuroscientists have discovered extra synapses in the brains of children and adolescents with autism. The excess is due to a slowdown in the normal brain “pruning” process during development, they say.
Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions. The study appears online in the journal Neuron.
A drug that restores normal synaptic pruning can improve autistic-like behaviors in mice, the researchers found, even when the drug is given after the behaviors appear.
“This is an important finding that could lead to a novel and much-needed therapeutic strategy for autism,” says Jeffrey Lieberman, professor and chair of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, who was not involved in the study.
Although the drug, rapamycin, has side effects that may preclude its use in people with autism, “the fact that we can see changes in behavior suggests that autism may still be treatable after a child is diagnosed, if we can find a better drug,” says the study’s senior investigator, David Sulzer, professor of neurobiology at CUMC.
During normal brain development, a burst of synapse formation occurs in infancy, particularly in the cortex, a region involved in autistic behaviors; pruning eliminates about half of these cortical synapses by late adolescence.
Scientists know that many genes linked to autism affect synapses, and some researchers have hypothesized that people with autism may have more synapses.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

IN AUTISM, BRAIN DOESN’T ‘PRUNE’ EXTRA SYNAPSES

Neurons in brains from people with autism do not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from unaffected brains (top) and brains from autistic patients (bottom); the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses. (Credit: Guomei Tang, Mark S. Sonders/CUMC)

Neuroscientists have discovered extra synapses in the brains of children and adolescents with autism. The excess is due to a slowdown in the normal brain “pruning” process during development, they say.

Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions. The study appears online in the journal Neuron.

A drug that restores normal synaptic pruning can improve autistic-like behaviors in mice, the researchers found, even when the drug is given after the behaviors appear.

“This is an important finding that could lead to a novel and much-needed therapeutic strategy for autism,” says Jeffrey Lieberman, professor and chair of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, who was not involved in the study.

Although the drug, rapamycin, has side effects that may preclude its use in people with autism, “the fact that we can see changes in behavior suggests that autism may still be treatable after a child is diagnosed, if we can find a better drug,” says the study’s senior investigator, David Sulzer, professor of neurobiology at CUMC.

During normal brain development, a burst of synapse formation occurs in infancy, particularly in the cortex, a region involved in autistic behaviors; pruning eliminates about half of these cortical synapses by late adolescence.

Scientists know that many genes linked to autism affect synapses, and some researchers have hypothesized that people with autism may have more synapses.

Continue Reading.

(via house-of-gnar)

tysoncrosbie:

Denver. Move here. :)

tysoncrosbie:

Denver. Move here. :)

(Source: sickpage, via house-of-gnar)